Superberry

Research Library

This scientific research is for informational use only. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Care/of provides this information as a service. This information should not be read to recommend or endorse any specific products.

From amla berries, staple herbs in Indian ayurveda, to acerola cherries, native to the Lesser Antilles from St. Croix to Trinidad, our superberry boost combines eleven different berries with thousands of years of traditional history. Recent research has shown that the antioxidants and vitamin C in berries can help protect the body against oxidative damage, encourage collagen production, and help keep immune cells healthy.*

Healthy aging

The essentiality of vitamin C to the normal function of the immune system has been established as noted by the National Academy of Medicine previously known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Vitamin C importantly serves as an electron donor to counteract reactive oxygen species, which are generated during phagocytosis and neutrophil activation from immune challenges. Specifically in the IOM report, additional effects of vitamin C on immune function have been outlined related to both normal innate and adaptive immune function.(1)

References
  1. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids.
    Institute of Medicine,
    Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.,
    2000

Skin health

In 2007, researchers using data from the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), examined associations between nutrient intakes and skin aging in 4025 women and found that higher vitamin C intakes were associated with a lower likelihood of a wrinkled appearance and dryness of the skin (1).

The European Food Safety Authority has established a relationship between vitamin C and collagen formation and authorizes the following claim to be made (2): “Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation and the normal function of bones, teeth, cartilage, gums, skin and blood vessels.”

References
  1. Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance among middle-aged American women.
    Cosgrove M, Franco O, Granger S et al.,
    Am J Clin Nutr,
    2007
  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to vitamin C and protection of DNA, proteins and lipids from oxidative damage (ID 129, 138, 143, 148), antioxidant function of lutein (ID 146), maintenance of vision (ID 141, 142), collagen formation (ID 130, 131, 136, 137, 149), function of the nervous system (ID 133), function of the immune system (ID 134), function of the immune system during and after extreme physical exercise (ID 144), nonhaem iron absorption (ID 132, 147), energy-yielding metabolism (ID 135), and relief in case of irritation in the upper respiratory tract (ID 1714, 1715) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061
    EFSA Journal,
    EFSA Journal,
    2009

Immune system

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes Vitamin C an antioxidant by it's demonstrated activity for participating in physiological, biochemical, or cellular processes that inactivate free radicals or prevent free radical-initiated chemical reactions.

The essentiality of vitamin C to the normal function of the immune system has been established as noted by the National Academy of Medicine previously known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Vitamin C importantly serves as an electron donor to counteract reactive oxygen species, which are generated during phagocytosis and neutrophil activation from immune challenges. Specifically in the IOM report, additional effects of vitamin C on immune function have been outlined related to both normal innate and adaptive immune function.(1)

Other authoritative bodies outside the United States have also demonstrated Vitamin C’s antioxidant capabilities. In addition to other claims, Health Canada has authorized the following antioxidant claims for Vitamin C (2):

• Source of/An antioxidant for the maintenance of good health

• Antioxidant for good health

• Source of/An antioxidant that helps fight/protect (cell) against/reduce (the oxidative effect of/the oxidative damage caused by/cell damage caused by) free radicals.

References
  1. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids.
    Institute of Medicine,
    Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.,
    2000
  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to vitamin C and protection of DNA, proteins and lipids from oxidative damage (ID 129, 138, 143, 148), antioxidant function of lutein (ID 146), maintenance of vision (ID 141, 142), collagen formation (ID 130, 131, 136, 137, 149), function of the nervous system (ID 133), function of the immune system (ID 134), function of the immune system during and after extreme physical exercise (ID 144), nonhaem iron absorption (ID 132, 147), energy-yielding metabolism (ID 135), and relief in case of irritation in the upper respiratory tract (ID 1714, 1715) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061
    EFSA Journal,
    EFSA Journal,
    2009

Vascular health

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), an agency of the European Union that provides independent scientific and food safety advice, concluded that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of vitamin C and the protection of DNA, proteins and lipids from oxidative damage (1).

Vitamin C’s role as an antioxidant, from fresh fruits and vegetables maintains a well established link with heart and vascular health benefits. These benefits are due to the positive effect vitamin C has on endothelial function.

While research with synthetic vitamin C has shown both benefit and non benefit for heart and vascular protection, higher intakes of vitamin C rich fruits and green leafy veggies are correlated with better long-term cardiovascular health. (2)

References
  1. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to vitamin C and protection of DNA, proteins and lipids from oxidative damage (ID 129, 138, 143, 148), antioxidant function of lutein (ID 146), maintenance of vision (ID 141, 142), collagen formation (ID 130, 131, 136, 137, 149), function of the nervous system (ID 133), function of the immune system (ID 134), function of the immune system during and after extreme physical exercise (ID 144), nonhaem iron absorption (ID 132, 147), energy-yielding metabolism (ID 135), and relief in case of irritation in the upper respiratory tract (ID 1714, 1715) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061
    EFSA Journal,
    EFSA Journal,
    2009
  2. Food Choices and Coronary Heart Disease: A Population Based Cohort Study of Rural Swedish Men with 12 Years of Follow-up
    Sara Holmberg, Anders Thelin and Eva-Lena Stiernström,
    Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health,
    2009
The following scientific research is for informational use only. Care/of provides this information as a service and does not receive compensation for studies referenced. This information should not be read to recommend or endorse any specific products. Dietary supplements are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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